You’re Wasting $10,000 to $130,000!

Yes, you’ve read it right! You can be wasting anywhere from $10,000 to $130,000 right now by not sharing your technical expertise with others. In other words, you can keep the money by writing about tech. All this is doable while keeping your full-time job. You think it’s impossible? That programmers like to pay nothing for resources? Think again, because hundreds of authors already did it, with outliers like Nathan Barry and Sacha Greif making six figures. The best part is that (after the info product is ready) it’s mostly passive income!

If you want to stop wasting $10,000 to $130,000 per year, and always wanted to become an author, pre-order my latest book ProgWriter [programmer + writer]: Lessons learned on my path from ordinary developer to writer of multiple programming books—that sell. In this short read, I explain what I did in a span of two years, what worked and what did not.

ProgWriter [programmer + writer]: Lessons learned on my path from ordinary developer to writer of multiple programming books—that sell

ProgWriter [programmer + writer]: Lessons learned on my path from ordinary developer to writer of multiple programming books—that sell

ORDER here->>> https://gum.co/tewg

You have a unique opportunity! While the book is 100% finished, you can still ask me any questions about self or traditional publishing like the ones you see in the Table of Contents below.

Here is the Table of Contents:

Introduction

I My Story

  1. Humble Beginnings
  2. Learning Node.js
  3. Mastering a Niche
  4. Going Traditional

II ProgWriter

  1. Why Write Books
  2. Why Write a Programming Book
  3. Traditional vs. Self-Publishing
  4. The Time Spent Writing
  5. The ProgWriter Creative Process

III Writing

  1. Researching The Topic
  2. Technical Book Categories
  3. Testing Your Topics
  4. Writing The Manuscript
  5. Markdown for The Win
  6. Health

IV Publishing

  1. Structuring The Book Properly
  2. Summarizing Chicago vs. AP Styles
  3. My Style: Paragraphs, Lists, Asides
  4. Dealing with Source Code and Figures
  5. Editing, Design and Finding Help

V Marketing

  1. Spread The Word
  2. Have a Platform
  3. Marketplace vs. Storefront
  4. How to Improve Amazon Sales
  5. Pricing
  6. Packaging and Bundling
  7. Up-selling and Cross-selling
  8. Launch
  9. Things to Avoid

VI Q&A

  • Should I have a dedicated website?
  • Should I prepare a launch plan for my book?
  • How to market to other developers (some of them who think everything should be free)?
  • What tools/programs do people use to write a technical book?
  • How do you go about the editing and
    proof-reading? Do you have a technical editor and a normal editor?
  • Any tips on topics or ideas to write about?
  • How to structure the book?
  • How much to write each day?
  • Any techniques on list building, beyond just blogging?
  • Should I create webinars?
  • What do you use to publish a book on
    Amazon?

Appendices

  • Successful ProgWriter Survey
  • Outro
  • Appendix A: Absolutely Bare Minimum Markdown Cheatsheet
  • Appendix C: Tools and Services
  • Appendix C: Traditional Publishers
  • Appendix D: International Publishers

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Best Regards,
Azat Mardan
Microsoft MVP | Book and Course Author | Software Engineering Leader
Azat Mardan avatar
https://www.linkedin.com/in/azatm
To contact Azat, the main author of this blog, submit the contact form or schedule a call at clarity.fm/azat and we can go over your bugs, questions and career.

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