Tag Archives: node.js

You Don’t Know Node: Quick Intro to Core Features

You Don't Know Node

This essay was inspired by the Kyle Simpson’s series of books, You Don’t Know JavaScript. They are a good start with JavaScript fundamentals. Node is mostly JavaScript except for a few differences which I’ll highlight in this essay. The code is in the You Don’t Know Node GitHub repository under the code folder.

Why care about Node? Node is JavaScript and JavaScript is almost everywhere! What if the world can be a better place if more developers master Node? Better apps equals better life!

This is a kitchen sink of subjectively the most interesting core features. The key takeaways of this essay are:

  1. Event loop: Brush-up on the core concept which enables non-blocking I/O
  2. Global and process: How to access more info
  3. Event emitters: Crash course in the event-based pattern
  4. Streams and buffers: Effective way to work with data
  5. Clusters: Fork processes like a pro
  6. Handling async errors: AsyncWrap, Domain and uncaughtException
  7. C++ addons: Contributing to the core and writing your own C++ addons

Event Loop

We can start with event loop which is at the core of Node.

Node.js Non-Blocking I/O

Node.js Non-Blocking I/O

It allows processing of other tasks while IO calls are in the process. Think Nginx vs. Apache. It allows Node to be very fast and efficient because blocking I/O is expensive!

Take look at this basic example of a delayed println function in Java:

System.out.println("Step: 1");
System.out.println("Step: 2");
Thread.sleep(1000);
System.out.println("Step: 3");

It’s comparable (but not really) to this Node code:

console.log('Step: 1')
setTimeout(function () {
  console.log('Step: 3')
}, 1000)
console.log('Step: 2')

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Node Patterns: From Callbacks to Observer

Node Patterns: From Callbacks to Observer

UPDATE: Now also available as a video (taken at NodePDX 2016) on YouTube.

This essay started as a presentation at the ConFoo Canada conference. Enjoy the slides ? at https://github.com/azat-co/node-patterns:

git clone https://github.com/azat-co/node-patterns
Node Patterns: From Callbacks to Observer

Node Patterns: From Callbacks to Observer

Before we can get started with Node patterns, let’s touch on some of the main advantages and features of using Node. They’ll help us later to understand why we need to deal with certain problems.

Node Advantages and Features

Here are some of the main reasons people use Node:

  • JavaScript: Node runs on JavaScript so you can re-use your browser code, libraries and files.
  • Asynchronous + Event Driven: Node executes tasks concurrently with the use of asynchronous code and patterns, thanks to event loop.
  • Non-Blocking I/O: Node is extremely fast due to its non-blocking input/output architecture and Google Chrome V8 engine.

That’s all neat but async code is hard. Human brains just didn’t evolve to process things in an asynchronous manner where event loop schedules different pieces of logic in the future. Their order often is not the same order in which they were implemented.

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Full Stack JavaScript

My new book Full Stack JavaScript (my 4th traditionally-published book) comes with a series of screencast videos for better immersion in a wonderful and mesmerizing world of Node.js, Backbone and MongoDB. It’s a one thing to read through the text and another to follow up with dynamic videos which walk you through the book’s projects.

Full Stack JavaScript

Full Stack JavaScript

The videos and the source code are open source, meaning they are publicly available. Therefore, you don’t have to buy a book—you can just watch the 14 videos on YouTube (playlist) and go through the code on GitHub (repository).

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Node Interactive 2015

Node Interactive 2015

Last week, I presented my talk at the inaugural Node Interactive ’15, in Portland, Oregon. It’s probably the largest Node.js conference in the world! My talk was on Node.js at Capital One. You might wonder: bank and Node.js? What they have in common? The best kept secret, which is not a secret at all is that Capital One, is moving into being a technology company with a focus on finance… not just a bank. It’s worth watching my talk if you’re are interested in hear about challenges of bringing innovation to a large company in a heavily regulated field.

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ExpressWorks Walkthrough: Node.js Web Framework [VIDEOS]

ExpressWorks Walkthrough: Node.js Web Framework [VIDEOS]

Have you ever wanted to learn basics of Node.js and the most popular Node.js web framework Express.js? If you are experienced web developer or software engineer who wants to learn Node.js and build some servers along the way, then this self-study workshop is for you.

What is ExpressWorks? It’s an automated tool which allows to learn Express.js from the author of one of the best books on Express.js—Pro Express.js— with this workshop that will teach you basics of Express.js and building Node.js web apps (a.k.a. servers).

You will walk through adventures via command-line interface. Each adventure has a problem, hints, and the solutions.

Some of the resources before you get started:

The entire playlist: on YouTube or just watch individual solutions below. Try solving problems without looking at the solutions!

Setup:

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How to Use Jade and Handlebars in Express.js

How to Use Jade and Handlebars in Express.js

I hated Jade as many other Node.js developes do.  But I changed 180 after I realized that it has tons of features.

At Storify and DocuSign we used Jade for EVERYTHING. We used Jade even in the browser. There is a little trick called jade-browser. It was developed by folks at Storify. I maintained it for a bit.

The funny thing is that DocuSign team used jade-browser long before they met me. They swear they hired me without knowing that I was involved in that library. :-)

Anyway, after covering Jade and Handlebars in previous posts, it’s time to apply them to do some real work. In this post, I’ll cover:

  • Jade and Handlebars usage in Express.js 4
  • Project: adding Jade templates to Blog

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To Engineers Who Tried to Use Jade Template Engine and Can’t Get Started

To Engineers Who Tried to Use Jade Template Engine and Can’t Get Started

When I started working at Storify as a Node.js Engineer. The tech stack was Express and Jade. I hate to admit it, but I struggled with Jade a lot!

Before, I mostly worked with Underscore, and Handlebars. I attempted to modify some HTML in the Jade templates. Other times I would only change the text. Those were trivial updates, but very often they cause the whole server to crash.

I was failing miserably to learn by trial and error. I hated Jade. I was starting to hate editing templates as well. Then I had a light bulb moment: I need a tutorial. I went to the official docs. I wish this article existed at that time. After spending just an hour learning Jade, I was able to use Jade and make all the changes to templates smoothly.

Smart people learn by their mistakes, and wise people learn from others. Don’t repeat my folly. Skim through this Jade tutorial to harness the power of this wonderful template language.

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Express.js Security Tips

Express.js Security Tips

TL;DR

This text is part of my new book Pro Express.js: Master Express.js—The Node.js Framework For Your Web Development [Apress, 2014]. Security is important, that’s why I decided to publish this chapter on my blog. The book will be released very soon.

The set of tips in this chapter deals with security in Express.js applications. Security is often a neglected topic that is deferred until the last minute before the release. Obviously, this approach of treating security as an afterthought is prone to leaving holes for attackers. A better approach is to consider and implement security matters from the ground up.
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NodeFrameworks.com Got GitHub Stats

Now our hand-picked registry of Node.js frameworks (NodeFrameworks.com) has GitHub statistics right on the website, so you don’t have to navigate back and forth when making a decision!

This is how it looks: each framework has a number (GitHub stars) next to its name. This serves as a social proof meaning the more people use the framework the more robust it is and the less bugs it has.

GitHub stats on NodeFrameworks.com

GitHub stats on NodeFrameworks.com

The buttons provided by the service called GitHub Buttons. The links to the frameworks’ GitHub, NPM, examples and other resources are hidden under the “i” icon.

Thank you Randson Oliveira for contributing and making pull requests!